Apple and Cidar Brined Pork Tenderloin

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Country Fried Shrimp Platter

Ri'Karia's Plate

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INGREDIENTS

1 pound raw shrimp, peeled and deveined with the tails attached

 1/2 cup flour

2 eggs lightly beaten

1 and 1/2 cups panko bread crumbs

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

DIRECTIONS

Use paper towels to pat the shrimp dry. Toss the shrimp with salt, black pepper and garlic powder. Gather three shallow dishes. I like to use cake pans. In one pan, add 1/2 cup flour. In another pan add 2 eggs, lightly beaten. In the third pan add 1 and 1/2 cups panko bread crumbs. Dip each shrimp in flour, then egg, then panko bread crumbs. Use your fingers to press the bread crumbs onto each piece of shrimp. Heat about two inches of canola or vegetable oil in a deep pot to around 350 degrees. Deep-fry the shrimp in batches, frying about 6 shrimp at a time. The shrimp will cook…

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Ribeye Steak with sauteed onions, garlic, and spinach

Ri'Karia's Plate

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Serves 4

Ingredients

4 10oz. Ribeye Steaks
1 white onion(chopped)
1 red onion(chopped)
3 cloves of garlic(chopped)
3 cups of spinach
2 tablespoons olive oil
dash of salt and pepper

Directions

Turn stove to medium high heat and oven on 450 degree F. Season steak generously with seasoning salt, adobo seasoning, and garlic salt.  Place steak into oiled skillet and cook about 3 minutes on both sides. While browning steak, put chopped onions, garlic and spinach into a separate skillet sauteing the vegetables for about a minute in olive oil, butter, and  a couple pinches of salt and pepper. Place the skillet with steak into the oven and let it broil for about 10-13 minutes. Put the sauteed vegetables on a plate  and top it off with the steak chopped into uniform pieces. Pour the juices from the steak on top of your meal and serve. Enjoy!!

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Country Fried Shrimp Platter

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INGREDIENTS

1 pound raw shrimp, peeled and deveined with the tails attached

 1/2 cup flour

2 eggs lightly beaten

1 and 1/2 cups panko bread crumbs

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon garlic powder

DIRECTIONS

Use paper towels to pat the shrimp dry. Toss the shrimp with salt, black pepper and garlic powder. Gather three shallow dishes. I like to use cake pans. In one pan, add 1/2 cup flour. In another pan add 2 eggs, lightly beaten. In the third pan add 1 and 1/2 cups panko bread crumbs. Dip each shrimp in flour, then egg, then panko bread crumbs. Use your fingers to press the bread crumbs onto each piece of shrimp. Heat about two inches of canola or vegetable oil in a deep pot to around 350 degrees. Deep-fry the shrimp in batches, frying about 6 shrimp at a time. The shrimp will cook very quickly! When they are golden brown, use a slotted spoon to remove them from the pan, and transfer them to a paper towel lined plate. Continue cooking the shrimp in batches until all shrimp are fried and golden brown. Serve with your favorite side. Enjoy!

Ribeye Steak with sauteed onions, garlic, and spinach

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Serves 4

Ingredients

4 10oz. Ribeye Steaks
1 white onion(chopped)
1 red onion(chopped)
3 cloves of garlic(chopped)
3 cups of spinach
2 tablespoons olive oil
dash of salt and pepper

Directions

Turn stove to medium high heat and oven on 450 degree F. Season steak generously with seasoning salt, adobo seasoning, and garlic salt.  Place steak into oiled skillet and cook about 3 minutes on both sides. While browning steak, put chopped onions, garlic and spinach into a separate skillet sauteing the vegetables for about a minute in olive oil, butter, and  a couple pinches of salt and pepper. Place the skillet with steak into the oven and let it broil for about 10-13 minutes. Put the sauteed vegetables on a plate  and top it off with the steak chopped into uniform pieces. Pour the juices from the steak on top of your meal and serve. Enjoy!!

Grilled Chicken Tenderloins topped with fresh Gala Apple Chutney and dried cranberries

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Ingredients

1 Pound chicken tenderloins

½ Cup Italian dressing

1 tsp fresh squeezed lime juice

1½ tsp honey

1 tbsp Gala Apple Chutney

1 tsp dried cranberries

Instructions

Mix the dressing, lime juice and honey together. Place the marinade in a zip lock bag with the chicken and make sure all the chicken is coated. Place this in the fridge to marinade for an hour, if you marinade longer the chicken might start cooking due to the lime juice so keep an eye on it!

In a skillet over medium heat, spray with cooking spray and place chicken in the pan. Let brown on all sides until cooked through, about 8 minutes total or until the internal temperature is 165 degrees.

Top it off with the apple and cranberry topping and serve with your favorite sides or with a salad. Enjoy!

Roast Beef Dinner

our thick cut usda choice chuck roast is slow roasted in the “pot roast” tradition for up to 14 hours until fork tender
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Serves 4-6

3 lb. chuck roast
1/2 can beef broth
1 cup flour
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
1 or 2 cloves garlic
1 medium onion, diced
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 bay leaf
dash of salt and pepper

Wash chuck roast. Season generously with salt, pepper and garlic powder. Coat with flour. Place floured roast into oiled skillet and brown lightly on both sides. While browning roast, add diced onions to skillet. Transfer roast and onions to greased crock-pot. Toss in whole garlic cloves and bay leaf. Pour in 1/2 can beef broth over roast and add salt and pepper. Cover and cook on low for 8 to 10 hours.

Chicken and Rice

Ri'Karia's Plate

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Ingredients

4 chicken thighs (Skin Removed)

2 cups Minute Rice

2 cups milk (I use skim, you can use any type)

1 can Campbells cream of chicken soup

1 can sliced mushroom

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease bottom and sides of casserole dish (I use olive oil, you can use cooking oil or butter as well).
Pour minute Rice into dish, then add milk, cream of chicken soup and can of sliced mushrooms.
Stir until cream of chicken soup is distrbuted through mix.
Season Chicken (again use your favorite seasonings) I have tried everything from garlic powder to regular chicken meat seasoning it all works well.
Place chicken in dish, spoon some of the mixture over each piece of chicken.
Cover and bake for 60-70 miutes. Remove from oven slightly mix and serve.

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Types of Chefs and Their Job Duties

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When talking about the system of chefs positions, I must say that there is a strict hierarchy. Basically the whole hierarchy came from The French Brigade system. Originally, this system was found to make the kitchen run as smoothly as possible. So, lets find out about the chef types, which are needed to be employed in your restaurant:
  1. Executive Chef (Chef de Cuisine). He is responsible for payroll, food-cost, personnel management, menu creation and essentially everything that happens in the kitchen.
  2. Senior Chef (Chef de Partie). The Senior Chef directs the prep work of kitchen staff and assistant cooks in his or her area.
  3. Demi Chef. He specializes in one type of dish and perhaps directs the prep work of staff key to that specialty.
  4. Saucier (The Sauce Chef, Assistant Chef, is the right-hand to the Executive Chef).Traditionally, it is the highest respected role in the kitchen brigade system of stations, reporting directly to the head chef or sous-chef. The Sauce Chef is responsible for sautéing foods and preparing soups and stews.
  5. Poissonnier (Fish Chef). He is responsible for the preparation of all fish dishes in the kitchen – acquiring fresh fish on a daily basis from local fishermen or other merchants, bringing in non-local catches, as needed, to supplement the menu.
  6. Rotisseur (Roast Chef). He is in charge of preparing any roasted or braised meats on the menu – from steaks to veal to lamb or any other similar items.
  7. Grillardin (Grill Chef). He is responsible for any foods that must be grilled – meats, poultry, or even vegetables.
  8. Friturier (Fry Cook). He is in charge of any foods that must be cooked in oils or other animal fats – from meats to potatoes to vegetables.
  9. Vegetable Chef. This type is divided into two positions: a potager chef (in charge of making any soups that are on the menu) and a legumier chef (in charge of preparing any vegetable dishes).
  10. Tournant (All-purpose Chef). He has to move from station to station, assisting with any tasks, as needed.
  11. Garde Manager (Pantry Chef). He is in charge of most cold dishes on the menu, making any large buffet services look presentable.
  12. Boucher. He is in charge of preparing all meats and poultry before they are delivered to their respective stations for preparation in menu dishes.
  13. Patissier (Pastry Chef). It is one of the most beloved of all the station chefs. He is responsible for creating or preparing baked goods, such as breads and pastries.

Chicken and Rice

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Ingredients

4 chicken thighs (Skin Removed)

2 cups Minute Rice

2 cups milk (I use skim, you can use any type)

1 can Campbells cream of chicken soup

1 can sliced mushroom

Directions

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease bottom and sides of casserole dish (I use olive oil, you can use cooking oil or butter as well).
Pour minute Rice into dish, then add milk, cream of chicken soup and can of sliced mushrooms.
Stir until cream of chicken soup is distrbuted through mix.
Season Chicken (again use your favorite seasonings) I have tried everything from garlic powder to regular chicken meat seasoning it all works well.
Place chicken in dish, spoon some of the mixture over each piece of chicken.
Cover and bake for 60-70 miutes. Remove from oven slightly mix and serve.

Chef Rico’s Lemon Pepper Trout

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Ingredients

6 (4 oz.) trout fillets
3 tablespoons butter, melted
2 medium lemons, thinly sliced
cooking spray
2 med. lemons, thinly sliced
sauce (recipe follows)

Brush trout fillets with butter and arrange lemon slices on top of each fillet. Coat a wire grilling basket with cooking spray. Place fish in basket, grill over medium hot coals 10 to 12 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork. Turn often, discard grilled lemon slices. Arrange trout on serving platter and drizzle with sauce. Garnish with lemon, if desired. Serve immediately.

Sauce:

3 tablespoons butter
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons lemon juice

Melt butter in small saucepan over low heat until golden brown, being careful not to burn butter. Stir in pepper and lemon juice.

Chef Rico’s Baked Broccoli Chicken Breast topped with melted cheddar cheese sauce

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Ingredients

4 skinless chicken breasts

1 cup of Almond Milk ( Regular Milk Works)

1 cup of Ritz style cracker ( crushed)

1 Can of Cheddar Cheese Soup

8 oz of frozen broccoli

6 oz of cheddar cheese – shredded

½ tsp of salt

½ tsp of pepper

 Instructions

Preheat oven to 350

In a bowl whisk milk and cheddar cheese soup together

Grease and place chicken in a casserole dish – season with salt and pepper

Pour soup over the chicken, sprinkle the following on top – crumbled ritz crackers, broccoli, and cheddar cheese

Bake uncovered for 45 minutes

Enjoy 🙂

Chef Rico’s Meatloaf Platter

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Ingredients

1 lb ground beef

1/2 medium onion, diced

1/2 green pepper, diced

1 egg

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pepper

0.5 (14 1/2 ounce) can diced tomatoes

2 biscuits, grated into crumbs

1/4 cup ketchup

Directions

preheat oven to 350 degrees.
place all ingredients,except ketchup, in large bowl.
mix well with hands.
place in loaf pan and press down gently. bake at 350 degrees for 1 hour. remove from oven and let rest for 5 minutes.
spread 1/4 cup ketchup over top of loaf and serve.

What is a Chef?

Ri'Karia's Plate

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A chef is a person who cooks professionally for other people. Traditionally, a chef is a highly skilled professional cook who is proficient in all aspects of food preparation.

The word “chef” is adopted (and shortened) from the term chef de cuisine , the director or head of a kitchen. (The French word comes from Latin caput and is a doublet with English “chief”.) In English, the title “chef” in the culinary profession originated in the haute cuisine of the 19th century, that introduced many French words into the English language. Today a chef is any professional cook, regardless of rank. In non-English European languages, a “chef” is the head chef; others are “cooks.”

Below are various titles given to those working in a professional kitchen and each can be considered a title for a type of chef. Many of the titles are based on the brigade de cuisine (or…

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Devil’s Food Cake Recipe

Yummy Food Recipes

Easy and Delicious Devil’s Food Cake Recipe Recipe by Makeeze Recipes

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Devil’s Food Cake Recipe Recipe by Makeeze Recipes

Recipe Ingridents
baking soda,baking powder,coffee,unsweetened cocoa powder,unsalted butter,large eggs,salt,granulated sugar,low-fat milk,cake flour

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Cooking Myths

I guarantee you will have heard at least one if not all of the food myths below. Over the years, they have become so ingrained in the popular psyche that they are now accepted as true almost without question. They are spewed out as fact and repeated in cookery books, magazines and by TV chefs until the very notion that they might be false seems impossible.

Like all myths, some of the beliefs below do have some truth to them, but most are, I am afraid, just complete and utter nonsense. Others are rooted in misconceptions and out-of-date research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Manly Cooking Experiences

Men have been under the thumb a bit for the last couple of decades. We have had to quash some of our more primal instincts, learn how to talk about our feelings and, God help us, even listen to our partner’s Taylor Swift albums without searching desperately for the nearest cliff from which to hurl ourselves. 

Even when it comes to food, we have been keeping our real urges under wraps and pretending to prefer a plate of roast organic vegetables when, in reality, we were screaming for a slab of roasted flesh with all our hearts and souls. Thankfully, however, being a real man is back in fashion — and being a real man who cooks is even more so.  

But you have to cook the right things. There’s no room for cupcakes in the real man’s kitchen. So here is a checklist of the 10 things every man should tick off on their quest to discover their inner savage.

Get out the grill

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Few activities can make men congregate so willingly as a barbecue. Within seconds of the grill being fired up, circles of men will have gathered and all will be offering sage advice on the best way to prepare the steaks and chops. If you have a garden and don’t have a grill, shame on you.  If you don’t have space, buy a good cast iron griddle and practice until you are rich enough to buy a house with a garden.

Kill, clean and cook

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Hunting used to be a way of life for a huge percentage of the population. Indeed, for many, it was often the only way they were able to put food on the table. Cue the anthropomorphism of animals in films like Bambi, and suddenly hunting for food was the equivalent of strangling puppies. I have no problem at all with hunting if what is dispatched ends up in the pot. There are few more satisfying meals than those that include ingredients you have caught, cleaned and prepared in the field.

Roast a whole animal

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Just about every culture has a tradition of roasting a whole animal, particularly at a time of celebration. Some countries will roast hogs, others goats or sheep and, in the case of the Argentinian Gauchos, even a whole steer.  Not only is the sight of an animal cooking on a spit over a fire undeniably impressive, and slicing off huge chunks of flesh with a sharp knife will make you feel like the ultimate man’s man.

Eat nose to tail

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If you are going to kill an animal for food, you owe it to the animal to eat “everything but the squeak,” not just the prime cuts you might find prepackaged in the supermarket. Many men now seem to be too squeamish to eat anything that looks like it came from an animal. But many dishes made with the insides of the beast can be incredibly delicious, so it’s time to literally cook with heart — and liver and kidneys.

Buy and learn how to care for chef’s knives

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Visit any department store on the weekend, and you will undoubtedly see men cooing loudly over the blocks of knives.  But most chefs I know will tell you that one great chef’s knife is better than a dozen mediocre ones. So, go to a specialized store and ask to try a number of chef’s knives for weight and balance before you buy one — make sure you get a good sharpener too. While you are putting a sharp edge on your blade, you can recite lines from Braveheart.

Smoke and cure your own meat

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Smoking and curing meat is one of the oldest methods of food preservation known to man. After generations of only consuming commercially smoked meats, men are now discovering the joys of preparing their own cuts of bacon, salt beef and salamis at home. Making bacon at home is incredibly easy, and the end results will ensure that you never go the store-bought route again.

Make your own sausages

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Most men, particularly those who spend all day behind a desk, crave hands-on experiences. I am no different, and my weekend relaxation is often centered round making my own sausages. It is very straightforward and requires little more than a grinder with a sausage-making attachment and some natural sausage casings. There are few things more fun than going to a grilling party with a tray of your own sausages and being able to say, “I made these.”

Cook over an open hearth

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Cooking over an open flame brings out the primal instinct in every man. From roasting marshmallows over a campfire or even just brewing up coffee while on a hike, there is something special about food prepared over fire. So, next time you plan a hike, why not prepare your meal on the trail? Just make sure to take all necessary precautions to prevent brush fires.

Make beer-can chicken

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Only a man would have thought that shoving an opened beer can up a chicken’s backside while it was cooking was a good idea. But it’s a method that really works. The beer evaporates during cooking, creating a steam that flavors the meat and keeps it beautifully moist. Well worth trying.

Have an old-style clam bake

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An original clam bake involved a mariner’s catch of lobsters and clams, along with potatoes and corn, popping away in a pit lined with stones. That may not be practical or safe today, but you can fashion a good version with a propane stove and a large pot.  Lots of clams, lots of cold beer and lots of your buddies enjoying the two can’t help but make for a great time.

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Buffalo Chicken Cheese Balls by Aaron McCargo

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Ingredients
1 store-bought rotisserie chicken
1/4 cup hot sauce (recommended: Frank’s Red Hot)
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 3/4 cups sharp Cheddar
1/4 cup freshly sliced scallions
1 cups all-purpose flour
3 eggs, lightly beaten
2 cups panko bread crumbs
Vegetable oil, for frying
Blue Cheese Dip:
1 1/2 cups mayonnaise
1/2 cup packed blue cheese, broken up
1/2 teaspoon hot sauce
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 lemon, juiced
1 teaspoon chopped garlic


Directions
Have oil heated to 350 degrees F.

Pick the meat from the chicken and discard the skin. Place the chicken in a large bowl and add the hot sauce, pepper, cheese, and scallions, and toss to combine. Roll the chicken into 2-ounce balls, about the size of a golf ball.

Place the flour, eggs, and bread crumbs in 3 separate bowls. Roll each ball in the flour, then the egg and then the bread crumbs. Set aside.

When the oil is hot fry the chicken balls in batches. Cook for about 2 minutes per batch. Remove the chicken to paper towel lined plate to drain the excess oil.

To make the sauce, combine all ingredients in a large bowl and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Serve the chicken alongside the dipping sauce.

Kicked up burger by Chef G. Garvin

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DETAILS & INGREDIENTS
1 Lb ground beef
Tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce
2 teaspoons chopped garlic
2 teaspoons chopped shallots
2 teaspoons chopped fresh Italian Parsley
¼ teaspoon salt
Pinch cayenne pepper
1 egg
1 teaspoon + 1 pinch of black pepper
2 Tablespoons bread crumbs
5 Tablespoons olive oil
3 Sourdough hamburger buns
3 Tablespoons mayonnaise
3 teaspoons Dijon mustard
3 slices tomato
For Avocado Burger: 1 avocado (peeled, pitted and sliced), 6 slices of onions, 6 slices Gruyere cheese
For Bacon Burger: 9 slices bacon (fried crisp), 6 slices blue cheese
For Prosciutto Burger: 3 slices prosciutto, 3 slices blue cheese, 3 fresh basil leaves

COOKING STEPS

  1. In a large glass bowl combine ground beef, Worcestershire sauce, garlic, shallot, parsley, salt and cayenne pepper. Add egg and 1 teaspoon black pepper; mix well. Add bread crumbs and mix again. Take one-third of meat mixture, roll it into a ball, then pat it down into a patty. Repeat to make two more patties.
  2. In a sauté pan heat olive oil over medium-high heat. Add patties to pan. When one side is cooked half-way through, flip the burgers so the other side can cook.
  3. Open 3 sourdough buns and spread 1 tablespoon mayonnaise and 1 teaspoon mustard on each bun. Sprinkle with a pinch of black pepper. Place a burger on the bottom of each bun. Add desired burger toppings and the tops of the buns.

Garvin Spice Blends

 
 
BBQ Spice Rub

BBQ SPICE RUB

A wonderful herb mixture that works beautifully on meat and poultry, and is perfect for on the grill or smoking.

Cajun Seasoning

CAJUN SEASONING

A classic Louisiana inspired blend of herbs & spices great for grilling steak, chicken, and seafood dishes.

Garlic Salt

GARLIC SALT

Made from a blend of course-ground garlic and salt. Works nicely with a wide variety of dishes including chicken, pasta, and salads.

Lemon Pepper

LEMON PEPPER

A citrusy blend of lemon, coarse black pepper, and salt that is great on the grill or your favorite fish & poultry dishes.

Salt Seasoning

SALT SEASONING

A versatile premium blend of herbs and spices that works as agreat addition to burgers, soups, salads, and more!

Truffle Salt

TRUFFLE SALT

The rare delicacy of White Alba truffle from the countryside of northern Italy, delicately blended with sea salt from the Mediterranean. This highly-prized ingredient brings a rich, earthy, flavor to your cooking as well as to hors d’oeuvres, risotto, cheese, and salads.

Veggie Seasoning

VEGGIE SEASONING

Add a zestful addition to your dishes with this veggie seasoning. Excellent on salads, beans, pasta, and rice.

Whole Chicken Rub

WHOLE CHICKEN RUB

This no-fail all-purpose chicken rub is great for preparing chicken and versatile enough to use with various other dishes.

 
 
 

Studying the Great World Cuisines and Regional Cooking Styles

Blooming Onion Recipe

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Batter

1/3 cup cornstarch
1 1/2 cups flour
2 teaspoons garlic, minced
2 teaspoons paprika
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pepper
24 ounces beer
4 vidalia onions (I use walla wallas here in Calgary)

Seasoned flour

2 cups flour
4 teaspoons paprika
2 teaspoons garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/4 teaspoon cayenne
Creamy Chili sauce
1 pint mayonnaise
1 pint sour cream
1/2 cup tomato chili sauce
1/2 teaspoon cayenne
Outback Dipping Sauce
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 teaspoons ketchup
2 teaspoons creamed horseradish
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon dried oregano
1 dash black pepper
1 dash cayenne

Directions:
Alrighty-forthe seasoned flour
Combine flour, paprika, garlic powder, pepper and cayenne-mix well.
Creamychili sauce
combine mayo, sour cream, chili sauce and cayenne-mix well.
Dippingsauce
Blend everything together well and let sit for 2 hours-refidgerated- or overnight.
Andfor the batter
Mix cornstarch, flour and seasonings until well blended.
Add beer and mix well.
Cut about 3/4 inch off top of onion and peel.

What is a Chef?

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A chef is a person who cooks professionally for other people. Traditionally, a chef is a highly skilled professional cook who is proficient in all aspects of food preparation.

The word “chef” is adopted (and shortened) from the term chef de cuisine , the director or head of a kitchen. (The French word comes from Latin caput and is a doublet with English “chief”.) In English, the title “chef” in the culinary profession originated in the haute cuisine of the 19th century, that introduced many French words into the English language. Today a chef is any professional cook, regardless of rank. In non-English European languages, a “chef” is the head chef; others are “cooks.”

Below are various titles given to those working in a professional kitchen and each can be considered a title for a type of chef. Many of the titles are based on the brigade de cuisine (or brigade system) documented by Auguste Escoffier, while others have a more general meaning depending on the individual kitchen.

Chef de cuisine, executive chef, chef manager, head chef, and master chef

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This person is in charge of all things related to the kitchen, which usually includes menu creation, management of kitchen staff, ordering and purchasing of inventory, and plating design. Chef de cuisine is the traditional French term from which the English word chef is derived.Head chef is often used to designate someone with the same duties as an executive chef, but there is usually someone in charge of a head chef, possibly making the larger executive decisions such as direction of menu, final authority in staff management decisions, etc. This is often the case for executive chefs with multiple restaurants.

 Sous-chef

The Sous-Chef de Cuisine (under-chef of the kitchen) is the second-in-command and direct assistant of the Chef de Cuisine. This person may be responsible for scheduling the kitchen staff, or substituting when the head chef is off-duty. Also, he or she will fill in for or assist theChef de Partie (line cook) when needed. This person is accountable for the kitchen’s inventory, cleanliness, organization, and the ongoing training of its entire staff. A sous-chef’s duties can also include carrying out the head chef’s directives, conducting line checks, and overseeing the timely rotation of all food product. Smaller operations may not have a sous-chef, while larger operations may have more than one.

Chef de partie

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chef de partie, also known as a “station chef” or “line cook,” is in charge of a particular area of production. In large kitchens, each Chef de partie might have several cooks or assistants. In most kitchens, however, the Chef de partie is the only worker in that department. Line cooks are often divided into a hierarchy of their own, starting with “first cook,” then “second cook,” and so on as needed.

Commis Chef

A commis is a basic chef in larger kitchens who works under a chef de partie to learn the station’s responsibilities and operation. This may be a chef who has recently completed formal culinary training or is still undergoing training.

Kitchen assistants

Kitchen assistants are of two types, kitchen-hands and stewards. Kitchen-hands assist with basic food preparation tasks under the chef’s direction. They carry out relatively unskilled tasks such as peeling potatoes and washing salad. Stewards are involved in the scullery, washing up and general cleaning duties. In a smaller kitchen, these duties may be incorporated.

communard is in charge of preparing the meal for the staff during a shift. This meal is often referred to as the staff or family meal.

The escuelerie (from 15th century French and a cognate of the English “scullery“), or the more modern plongeur or dishwasher, is the keeper of dishes, having charge of dishes and keeping the kitchen clean. A common humorous title for this role in some modern kitchens is “chef de plonge” or “head dishwasher”.

Culinary education

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Culinary education is available from many institutions offering diploma, associate, and bachelor degree programs in culinary arts. Depending on the level of education, this can take one to four years. An internship is often part of the curriculum. Regardless of the education received, most professional kitchens follow the apprenticeship system, and most new cooks will start at a lower-level 2nd or 1st cook position and work their way up.

The training period for a chef is generally four years as an apprentice. A newly qualified chef is advanced or more commonly a torquecommis-chef, consisting of first-year commis, second-year commis, and so on. The rate of pay is usually in accordance with the training status. Commis chefs, like all other chefs except the executive-chef, are placed in sections of the kitchen (e.g., the starter (appetizer) or entrée sections) under the guidance of a demi-chef de partie and are given relatively basic tasks. Ideally, over time, acommis will spend a certain period in each section of the kitchen to learn the basics. Unaided, a commis may work on the vegetable station of a kitchen.

The usual formal training period for a chef is two to four years in catering college. They often spend the summer in work placements. In some cases this is modified to ‘day-release’ courses; a chef will work full-time in a kitchen as an apprentice and then would have allocated days off to attend catering college. These courses can last between one to three years.

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Uniform

The standard uniform for a chef includes a hat called a toquenecktiedouble-breasted jacket, apron and shoes with steel or plastic toe-caps. A chef’s hat was originally designed as a tall rippled hat called a Dodin Bouffant or more commonly a toque. The Dodin Bouffant had 101 ripples that represent the 101 ways that the chef could prepare eggs. The modern chef’s hat is tall to allow for the circulation of air above the head and also provides an outlet for heat. The hat helps to prevent sweat from dripping down the face. Neckties were originally worn to allow for the mopping of sweat from the face, but as this is now against health regulations, they are largely decorative. The chef’s neck tie was originally worn on the inside of the jacket to stop sweat running from the face and neck down the body. The jacket is usually white to show off the chef’s cleanliness and repel heat, and is double-breasted to prevent serious injuries from burns and scalds. The double breast also serves to conceal stains on the jacket as one side can be rebuttoned over the other.

An apron is worn to just below knee-length, also to assist in the prevention of burns because of spillage. If hot liquid is spilled onto it, the apron can be quickly removed to minimize burns and scalds. Shoes and clogs are hard-wearing and with a steel-top cap to prevent injury from falling objects or knives. According to some hygiene regulations, jewelry is not allowed apart from wedding bands and religious jewelry. If wound dressings are required they should be blue—an unusual colour for foodstuffs—so that they are noticeable if they fall into food. Facial hair and longer hair are often required to be netted, or trimmed, for food safety. Bandages on the hands are usually covered with latex gloves.

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How to become a Chef

Ri'Karia's Plate

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If you love to cook so much that you want to make it your profession, consider becoming a chef. The path isn’t easy – it involves long hours, physical labor, and heavy competition – but the reward is the opportunity to design creative dishes, run a kitchen, or even manage a restaurant. Learn what education and experience you need to start your career as a chef.
 Part 1 of 3: Decide to Become a Chef
  1. Get a job at a restaurant. Whether you’re still in high school or are thinking about transitioning to culinary arts from a career already underway, the first thing to do is get exposure to the conditions, techniques, equipment, and culture that surround restaurant work.
    • Your first restaurant job doesn’t have to be prestigious. Apply to be a server at your local cafe, or work for your college’s catering service. Experience is important in the restaurant business…

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Hash Brown Casserole by Rico J. Gore

Ri'Karia's Plate

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Ingredients:

Servings:
4

13 -15 ounces of shredded hash browns
1 cup of shredded cheese (colby to sharp)
1/4 cup beef broth
1/8 cup of minced onions or 1/8 cup finely diced onion
1/2 cup milk
1/2 tablespoon butter or 1/2 tablespoon margarine
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt or 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon black pepper


Directions:

1
Melt butter or margarine and mix in milk, broth, salt, pepper, and onion in large measuring cup or bowl.
2
In large skillet heat hash browns and fold in shredded cheese until melted.
3
Preheat oven to 425°F.
4
Prepare 9×13 baking dish or pan.
5
Put hash brown cheese mixture into prepared pan and pour other ingredients in and fold until hash browns swell in most of the liquid. Spoon the hash browns flat and place in oven to bake for 45 minutes.

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Best Meats for Cholesterol

It’s important to know your health priorities when selecting the proper meat. There are meats you can enjoy that won’t affect your cholesterol or send your sodium levels through the roof. Read on to learn more.

PORK TENDERLOIN

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While pork can definitely be considered a heavy food, lean cuts of pork can be pretty nutrient rich and even low in calories. A three ounce serving of pork tenderloin has 122 calories  and three grams of fat.

BUFFALO

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Buffalo (also known as bison) can be a great healthy alternative to red meat like steak or beef. The taste of buffalo is comparable to that of more common red meats and it has half as much fat and fewer calories.

ROAST BEEF

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If you can’t bear to give up deli meats, which are notorious for nitrates, then roast beef is your best bet. It’s leaner than most deli meats, lower in saturated fat and offers about seven grams of protein per slice.

CHICKEN

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Chicken can be an exceptionally lean meat and impressively low in saturated fat when consumed without the skin. Chicken is also filled with nutrients like selenium, vitamin B6 and Vitamin B3. Traditionally white meat has been lauded as the healthier part of the chicken, but while white meat is lower in calories, dark meat contains more zinc and B vitamins  than white meat does. Did you know that chicken can actually bee a natural anti-depressant as well?

OSTRICH

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Ostrich is another great choice for those trying to eat less red meat but who still crave the taste. It’s technically poultry and actually contains half the fat of chicken with 2.8 grams in comparison with chicken’s 7.4. A three-ounce serving has 123 calories and over 24 grams of protein.

TURKEY

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It’s not Thanksgiving without turkey and the good news is that you don’t even have to feel guilty about enjoying it! A four-ounce serving of white meat turkey without the skin has 158 calories and 34 grams of protein. Turkey is also filled with vitamins B3 and B6 in addition to maintaining a low saturated fat content.

PHEASANT

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Pheasant is another type of bird that has a lot of nutrients and not too many calories. Enjoying this one with the skin is a bit more fattening, but at least there are a lot of minerals in the bird to make up for it.

LAMB SHANK

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This meat comes from the shank half of the lamb and if it’s very well trimmed it can be a reasonably healthy meat to enjoy. A lean three-ounce serving of lamb shank has about 153 calories and under six grams of fat. This size serving of lamb shank also contains about 50 percent of the daily recommended intake of zinc for women and 36 percent for men.

VEAL

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Yes, veal has more cholesterol than beef. However, if you enjoy leaner cuts of veal like sirloin you’ll be consuming 150 calories or less per three-ounce serving.

PORK CHOP

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A boneless pork chop has about 147 calories per serving and 23 grams of protein. The sodium levels are also pretty low on this meat.

Worst Meats for Cholesterol

CORNED BEEF

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Corned beef is generally made of the fattier areas of brisket, which should give you a pretty good image of its health profile. It has 16 grams of fat, 5 grams of saturated fat and 960 mg of sodium, not to mention nitrates. Savor this meat on special occasions.

PROSCIUTTO

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Even if it seems light and thin, just a two-ounce serving of prosciutto contains over 10 grams of fat and four grams of that fat is unhealthy saturated fat. In addition to its unsavory fat content, prosciutto is also salted, which makes the sodium content a whopping 973 mg per serving when the daily recommended limit is 1500 mg. Enjoy this one sparingly.

HAM

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When eating ham spring for the leaner versions because it is a high fat food. A three-ounce serving of boneless roasted ham has 7.7 grams of fat with 2.7 grams made up of saturated fat. 

SALAMI

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If you want to knock out 17 percent of your daily recommended sodium intake with one slice, then try salami. Of the six grams of fat in that slice, two are saturated fat. Savor this one on special occasions.

BACON

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It’s a shame that such a popular food isn’t very nutritionally beneficial since it is both high sodium and saturated fat. Try sprinkling bacon on dishes as a condiment instead, or give turkey bacon a shot.

BOLOGNA

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This classic lunch meat is definitely one that should be enjoyed sporadically. One slice contains 300 mg of sodium and 3 grams of saturated fat.

HOT DOGS

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Hot dogs are a very common processed meat. Processed meats can contain nitrates and are frequently high in sodium.

MORTADELLA

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Roughly two ounces of mortadella contain 14 grams of fat and 560 mg of sodium. That’s 23 percent of your daily recommended intake of sodium.

CHICKEN NUGGETS

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This childhood staple is sadly not very healthy. Sometimes chicken nuggets contain very little chicken and the ingredients that end up in a nugget can be icky. Plus the signature breaded exterior only adds calories. Your best bet is to make your own chicken nuggets from scratch.

DUCK

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Duck actually has a lot of nutrients in it, but if it’s not prepared properly it becomes a very fattening meal. Try to keep the duck lean by cooking it skinless, trimming the fat and not using a lot of oil. Of the six grams of fat in a serving, there are 2.3 grams of saturated fat,so there’s no need to add more.

Healthiest Foods

Lemons

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 Just one lemon has more than 100 percent of your daily intake of vitamin C, which may help increase “good” HDL cholesterol levels and strengthen bones.

Citrus flavonoids found in lemons may help inhibit the growth of cancer cells and act as an anti-inflammatory.

Quick Tip:

Add a slice of lemon to your green tea. One study found that citrus increases your body’s ability to absorb the antioxidants in the tea by about 80 percent.

Broccoli

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One medium stalk of broccoli contains more than 100 percent of your daily vitamin K requirement and almost 200 percent of your recommended daily dose of vitamin C — two essential bone-building nutrients.

The same serving also helps stave off numerous cancers.

Quick Tip:

Zap it! Preserve up to 90 percent of broccoli’s vitamin C by microwaving. (Steaming or boiling holds on to just 66 percent of the nutrient.)

Dark Chocolate

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Just one-fourth of an ounce daily can reduce blood pressure in otherwise healthy individuals.

Cocoa powder is rich in flavonoids, antioxidants shown to reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol and increase “good” HDL levels.

Quick Tip:

A dark chocolate bar contains about 53.5 milligrams of flavonoids; a milk chocolate bar has fewer than 14.

Potatoes

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One red potato contains 66 micrograms of cell-building folate — about the same amount found in one cup of spinach or broccoli.

One sweet potato has almost eight times the amount of cancer-fighting and immune-boosting vitamin A you need daily.

Quick Tip:

Let your potato cool before eating. Research shows that doing so can help you burn close to 25 percent more fat after a meal, thanks to a fat-resistant starch.

Salmon

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 A great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to a reduced risk of depression, heart disease, and cancer.

— A 3-ounce serving contains almost 50 percent of your daily dose of niacin, which may protect against Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss.

Quick Tip:

Opt for wild over farm-raised, which contains 16 times as much toxic polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) as wild salmon.

Walnuts

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Contain the most omega-3 fatty acids, which may help reduce cholesterol, of all nuts.

Omega-3s have been shown to improve mood and fight cancer; they may protect against sun damage, too (but don’t skip the SPF!).

Quick Tip:

Eat a few for dessert: The antioxidant melatonin, found in walnuts, helps to regulate sleep.

Avocados

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 Rich in healthy, satisfying fats proven in one study to lower cholesterol by about 22 percent.

— One has more than half the fiber and 40 percent of the folate you need daily, which may reduce your risk of heart disease.

Quick Tip:

Adding it to your salad can increase the absorption of key nutrients like beta-carotene by three to five times compared with salads without this superfood.

Garlic

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Garlic is a powerful disease fighter that can inhibit the growth of bacteria, including E. coli.

Allicin, a compound found in garlic, works as a potent anti-inflammatory and has been shown to help lower cholesterol and blood-pressure levels.

Quick Tip:

Crushed fresh garlic releases the most allicin. Just don’t overcook; garlic exposed to high heat for more than 10 minutes loses important nutrients.

Spinach

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Spinach contains lutein and zeaxanthin, two immune-boosting antioxidants important for eye health.

Recent research found that among cancer-fighting fruits and veggies, spinach is one of the most effective.

Quick Tip:

Spinach is a healthy — and flavorless — addition to any smoothie. You won’t taste it, we promise! Try blending 1 cup spinach, 1 cup grated carrots, 1 banana, 1 cup apple juice, and ice.

Beans

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Eating a serving of legumes (beans, peas, and lentils) four times a week can lower your risk of heart disease by 22 percent.

 That same habit may also reduce your risk of breast cancer.

Quick Tip:

The darker the bean, the more antioxidants it contains. One study found that black bean hulls contain 40 times the amount of antioxidants found in white bean hulls.

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5 Healthiest Cheeses

Cheese gets a lot of bad press for clogging arteries and packing on the pounds. But just because you shouldn’t eat an entire platter of Paula Deen’s cheese balls doesn’t mean you have to avoid cheese altogether.

Cheese can be both delicious and a great source of lean protein, calcium, phosphorus, and other health benefits — if you choose the right varieties. Here are five cheeses that belong on any shopping list.

1. Feta

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A key component of Greek cuisine, feta is lower in fat and calories than most cheeses, says Natalie Caine-Bish, an associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at Kent State University. A one-ounce serving — enough to make a Greek salad lover happy — has 4 grams of protein and only 74 calories.

Caine-Bish says feta’s characteristic strong flavor means you can get away with using less cheese without feeling cheated. Feta’s salty flavor makes it a good choice to crumble on salads and soups. It also pairs well with sweeter produce, like watermelon or sweet potatoes.

Tip: Although domestic feta is often made with cow’s milk, Greek feta is made from sheep or goat’s milk, which makes it a good choice for someone with problems digesting bovine dairy products. Keep in mind, though, that unpasteurized feta and other soft cheeses have a higher risk of containing the Listeria bacteria than other cheeses — so be sure to buy pasteurized feta if you’ll be serving it to a pregnant woman or someone with a compromised immune system.

2. String cheese

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Seriously. String cheese, that favorite kid snack, is a great choice for adults too.

For starters, if you choose string cheese made of part-skim mozzarella, it’s low in calories and high in protein (a one-ounce serving has 71 calories and 7 grams of protein).

What’s more, string cheese isn’t actually a processed cheese — mozzarella naturally behaves in that stringy way, so it counts as a whole food. (Just make sure to buy string cheese that’s 100 percent mozzarella.)

Tip: String cheese is “quick and easy — grab and go, and already portioned out for you,” says Silvia Veri, the nutrition supervisor at Beaumont Health System’s Weight Control Center in Royal Oak, Michigan. The fact that it’s prepackaged makes it handy for healthy snacks at work, between errands, or at home.

3. Parmesan

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Like feta, Parmesan is a great choice because just a little packs a potent, nutty punch.

Parmigiano-Reggiano comes from the Parma area of Italy, and its strong flavor has inspired a lot of buzz throughout history: Samuel Pepys famously buried his Parmesan cheese to keep it safe during the Great Fire of London, and Boccacio, in The Decameron, imagines a mountain of Parmesan inhabited by macaroni and ravioli makers.

Parmesan is relatively low in calories (110 in a one-ounce serving), but it’s high in sodium (449 milligrams for the same serving size), so be sure to use it in moderation.

Tip: Try shaving pieces onto a salad or eating small slices with ripe apples or pears, in addition to grating it over pasta and pizza.

4. Swiss

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Swiss is another strong cheese that’s good for you. What we call Swiss cheese is often Swiss Emmentaler (or Emmental), though other cheeses with a similar taste and hole-studded texture are sometimes lumped in as well.

Swiss is a popular cheese, and Caine-Bish likes it specifically for that reason. Since it comes in a number of varieties, including low-sodium or low-fat, it’s easy to find a version that fits your dietary needs.

As a hard cheese, Swiss is also richer in phosphorus than nearly all soft cheeses. According to Caine-Bish, “Calcium and phosphorus are key to bone formation and to maintaining bone density” — important for women of any age.

Tip: Try adding a slice to your sandwich or grating a few ounces into scrambled or baked eggs. Small slices or cubes make a great snack, especially with fruit instead of crackers.

5. Cottage cheese

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There’s a reason dieters love cottage cheese: It’s high in protein, low in fat (if you buy a low-fat variety), and versatile enough to add to most any meal or snack.

“You can eat it with almost anything,” says Veri. “You can eat it with veggies and make it savory, or add fruit and cinnamon and make it sweet.”

A one-ounce serving of low-fat cottage cheese has 3 grams of protein and only 20 calories. Like all cheeses, it’s also high in calcium.

Indian paneer, Mexican queso fresco, and other types of farmer’s cheese are simply pressed versions of cottage cheese. If you’re the DIY-type, this cheese and its firmer derivatives are some of the easiest cheeses to make at home.

Tip: Cottage cheese can have a lot of sodium, especially when it’s low-fat or nonfat. Be sure to check the nutrition label on the container before buying it. Some companies, such as Lucerne and Friendship Dairy, make no-salt-added versions.

Chicken Pot Pie by Rico J. Gore

Ri'Karia's Plate

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Ingredients

3 whole (6 split) chicken breasts, bone-in, skin-on
3 tablespoons olive oil
Kosher salt
Freshly ground black pepper
5 cups chicken stock, preferably homemade
2 chicken bouillon cubes
12 tablespoons (1 1/2 sticks) unsalted butter
2 cups yellow onions, chopped (2 onions)
3/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup heavy cream
2 cups medium-diced carrots, blanched for 2 minutes
1 (10-ounce) package frozen peas (2 cups)
1 1/2 cups frozen small whole onions
1/2 cup minced fresh parsley leaves


For the pastry:
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup vegetable shortening
1/4 pound cold unsalted butter, diced
1/2 to 2/3 cup ice water
1 egg beaten with 1 tablespoon water, for egg wash
Flaked sea salt and cracked black pepper


Directions
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Place the chicken breasts on a baking sheet and rub them with olive oil…

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Crusted Sirloin with Rockin’ Portobellos by Chef Aaron McCargo Jr.

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http://www.aaronmccargo.com/

Ingredients


1/4 cup prepared horseradish
1/4 cup spicy mustard
3 tablespoons minced garlic
2 tablespoons cracked black pepper, plus more for seasoning
1/4 cup olive oil, plus 2 tablespoons for searing
1/4 cup panko bread crumbs
2 (6-ounce) petite sirloin steaks
Coarse sea salt
2 tablespoons butter, to sear
Portobellos:
4 tablespoons butter, divided
1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme leaves
4 portobello caps, sliced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cracked black pepper
Splash red wine
1/4 cup beef broth
Splash sherry vinegar


Directions


Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Whisk together horseradish, mustard, garlic, 2 tablespoons black pepper, and 1/4 cup of olive oil in a small bowl. Stir in the panko bread crumbs and set aside. Season the steaks on both sides with coarse sea salt and black pepper. Brush the horseradish bread crumb mixture on 1 side of the sirloin steaks.

In a large saute pan over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons of oil and 2 tablespoons of butter. Sear the steaks for 2 minutes, then turn over and cook for an additional 2 minutes. Remove the steaks to a quarter sheet tray with a rack. Drain the excess oil from the saute pan. Put the steaks in the oven and cook until the breading browns, about 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and let rest.

Portobellos:

In the same pan that the steaks were seared, add 2 tablespoons of the butter and the thyme. Turn the heat to high and add the portobello mushrooms. Add the salt and pepper and cook until the mushrooms are soft and slightly colored, about 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in a splash of red wine, the beef broth, and a splash of sherry vinegar. Reduce until the liquid just coats the mushrooms. Stir in the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter to give the mushrooms a creamier consistency. Arrange the steaks on serving plates and top with the mushrooms.

Chef Aaron McCargo Jr.

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http://www.aaronmccargo.com/

PORK TENDERLOIN WITH BRAISED MUSHROOM RAGOUT by Chef G. Garvin

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http://www.chefgarvin.com/

DETAILS & INGREDIENTS


 

2 pork tenderloins (1 to 1 1/2 lbs, each)
kosher salt and ground black pepper
2 tablespoons cooking oil
12 to 14 slices prosciutto
1/2 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms
1/2 cup sliced oyster mushrooms
1/2 cup sliced morel mushrooms
2 tablespoons diced shallots
1 tablespoon shaved garlic
1/4 cup white wine
6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter
 
 
COOKING STEPS


 

Season the pork with salt and pepper
Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a large pan. Add the pork to the pan; sear for 2 minuts on all sides. Remove the pork from the pan and slice into 2-ounce portions. Wrap each portion with a slice of prosciutto, cut to fit. Return the pork to the pan, searing the prosciutto on all sides. Place the pork pieces back in the pan, cut side down; cover and cook for another 5 to 7 minutes or until medium (160F), turning once.
For the ragout, add the remaining 1 tablespoons oil to the saute pan. Add all the mushrooms, shallots, and garlic. Season the mixture with salt and pepper and saute for 3 to 5 minutes or until tender. Add the wine and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 3 minutes or until liquid is reduced by half. Whisk in butter, 1 tablespoon at a time. Serve the ragout with the pork.
Note: You can use any combination of wild and domestic mushrooms to equal 1 and 1/2 cups.
Chef G. Garvin
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“CATERING BY MARI” Founded by Chef Marissa Vega

Catering By Mari

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Catering-by-Mari/700549516663169

“We bring the restaurant to you!”

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https://www.facebook.com/pages/Catering-by-Mari/700549516663169

Chef Marissa Vega

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“We bring the restaurant to you!”

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Catering-by-Mari/700549516663169